Sky Events 2018

June

  • June 2: M13, the Hercules Globular Cluster will be well-placed for observation.
  • June 3: M12, a globular cluster in Ophiuchus, will be well-placed for observation.
  • June 5: M10, a globular cluster in Ophiuchus, will be well-placed for obsevation.
  • June 6: M62, a globular cluster in Ophiuchus, will be well-placed for observation.
  • June 6: Third Quarter Moon
  • June 10: Ophiuchid shower peaks, with a maximum rate of about 5 meteors per hour.
  • June 10: M92, a globular cluster in Hercules, will be well-placed for observation.
  • June 13: New Moon
  • June 16:  The Moon, Venus, and M44 will make a close approach, passing within 2°20′ of each other. 
  • June 18: The open star cluster IC 4665 in Ophiuchus will be well-placed for observation.
  • June 20:  Ophiuchid shower peaks again, with a maximum rate of about 5 meteors per hour.
  • June 20: First Quarter Moon
  • June 21: Summer Solstice
  • June 23: The Moon and Jupiter will make a close approach, passing within 4°01′ of each other.
  • June 27: The Moon and Saturn will make a close approach, passing within 1°46′ of each other.
  • June 28: Full Moon
  • June 28: The open star cluster NGC 6633 in Ophiuchus will be well-placed for observation.
  • June 30: The Moon and Mars will share the same right ascension, with the Moon passing 4°46′ to the north of Mars.

July

  • July 1: The open star cluster IC 4756 in Serpens will be well placed for observation. 
  • July 3: Third Quarter Moon
  • July 6: Comet 37P/Forbes is forecast to reach its brightest, at around mag 11.1. It will be visible after midnight.
  • July 8: The Capricornid meteor shower will reach its maximum rate of activity. The radiant of the shower will appear 25° above the southeastern horizon at midnight. This means you are likely to see only around 2 meteors per hour, since the radiant will be low in the sky, reducing the chance of seeing meteors. Some shooting stars associated with the shower are expected to be visible each night from July to August.
  • July 12: New Moon
  • July 20: The Moon and Jupiter will make a close approach, passing within 4°13′ of each other.
  • July 21: The α–Cygnid meteor shower will reach its maximum rate of activity of about 5 meteors per hour.
  • July 25: The Moon and Saturn will make a close approach, passing within 1°59′ of each other. 
  • July 27: Total Lunar Eclipse from 15:30 until 17:13.
  • July 27: Full Moon
  • July 29: The δ–Aquarid meteor shower will reach its maximum rate of activity. The radiant of the shower will appear 17° above the southeastern horizon at midnight. This means you are likely to see only around 5 meteors per hour, since the radiant will be low in the sky, reducing the chance of seeing meteors.